Butterick 6385: Cafe au Coat

I’m soooo glad that I decided to plough ahead and do a wool coat in spring because it’s snowing today and I have had more than one opportunity to wear it already.  For some reason I figured Butterick 6385 was the easier of the two coats on the one I  should work on first. In reality I think that it was just the least expensive of the two ( less and lower cost fabric) so If I messed it up I wouldn’t feel as bad. The pattern itself was harder.

imgres

The fabric I used was a 100% wool coating from Fabric.com in the color Cafe au Lait. I bought it during one of their 70% off sales so I scored 3 yards for just $36. Turns out I only needed 2 yards….and suggestions on how to use the last yard? Once it arrived it seemed a bit thin (again, hindsight it was probably fine). After reading an article on threads called Understanding Underlining I decided some flannel would make a cozy addition to the interior. Boy was it time intensive! First you cut out the flannel out of the same pieces as the coat.   Then stack them and baste down the middle. Trim the flannel to account for turn of cloth. The hand baste the flannel to the wool and treat as a single piece.  I think the extra effort was worth it because it made the coat super warm and toasty but I don’t think I will be using it on my blue coat because everything got very bulky.

Once I stitched the panels together I trimmed the flannel pressed the seams open and then catch-stitched all the seams by hand hoping to alleviate some of that aforementioned bulk.

DSC_0708

 

So much hand work, my fingers were hating me! At this point I took a break to make my easter dress.

Having never done a coat before I found some interesting details in the pattern. I’m not sure it this is standard or not but I think it makes my coat seem more special. The lining has its own separate pattern pieces and the center back includes a little pleat to allow extra mobility across the back in between the shoulder blades.

DSC_0743

The pocket (per the pattern) has wool on the side touching you and lining on the other side. So if the pocket peaks open you only see wool but the bulk is reduced by using lining for the other half

DSC_0740

The lining is attached around the wrists and neck but is allowed to hand free across the bottom. I took a quick look at my Calvin Klein coat and i’ts made the same way.  I liked this because the lining doesn’t pull in any weird way. I did some thread chains to attach the lining at the various seams.  I also catch stitch the coat hem so there are no visible topstitching.

DSC_0744

Enough construction notes…you want to see this puppy on right! You’ll notice it’s missing buttons. I bought some nice big wooden ones but when it came time for buttonholes I could not get my machine to do them. It made them just fine when I did a test on double thickness of wool but for some reason  it’s just too thick to work on the coat.  I could sew the holes by hand with a blanket stitch but I’m worried that it would look to messy and I would hate to mess up all the work I did with messy button holes. For the time being it’s to be a closureless coat. Lesson learned, do bound buttonholes on the next coat ( that one only has two so it shouldn’t be too bad).

DSC_0725
me-thinks I may have over pressed it

I can’t help but feel like a girl-boss when I wear this coat. It turned out almost exactly like I envisioned.

DSC_0736

DSC_0733

 

 

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Butterick 6385: Cafe au Coat

  1. Looks like a camel hair coat I used to have.
    Since it is buttonless, you could use the extra yard to make
    a smart, yet simple belt to cinch it up with, should the weather demand it.
    Like today, out your way! 🙂
    Great deal on the fabric and you have made a very “girl boss” coat for yourself!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s